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© Copyright 2017, Digital Photography Beginners. All rights reserved.

How Do You Avoid The

Red-eye Effect In Dim

Light?

Red-eye occurs more at night because the

eye's pupil dilates to allow more light in.

Your camera's flash reflects nearly directly back off the exposed retina. Many cameras have a red-eye setting that pre-flashes a bright red light into your subject's eye, causing the pupil to contract, but oftentimes it isn't enough to compensate at night. If camera does not have a red-eye setting or it isn't preventing the effect enough, alternatives are to move (if possible) the source of the flash away from the camera's lens, making the reflection less directly back into the lens. If moving the source of the flash isn't feasible, try having the subject look slightly away from the lens, which also redirects the angle of red-eye reflection.
Avoid Redeye Effect in Dim Light Digital Photography Beginners
© Copyright 2017, Digital Photography Beginners. All rights reserved.

How Do You

Avoid The Red-

eye Effect In Dim

Light?

Red-eye occurs more at

night because the eye's

pupil dilates to allow more

light in.

Your camera's flash reflects nearly directly back off the exposed retina. Many cameras have a red-eye setting that pre- flashes a bright red light into your subject's eye, causing the pupil to contract, but oftentimes it isn't enough to compensate at night. If camera does not have a red-eye setting or it isn't preventing the effect enough, alternatives are to move (if possible) the source of the flash away from the camera's lens, making the reflection less directly back into the lens. If moving the source of the flash isn't feasible, try having the subject look slightly away from the lens, which also redirects the angle of red- eye reflection.
Digital Photography Beginners