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© Copyright 2017, Digital Photography Beginners. All rights reserved.

RAW vs JPEG Pictures

Having your DSLR set in a mode to create jpeg's is the easiest, but not always

the best.

You really need to make sure your exposure and white balance are close to perfect. Because if you need to make adjustments it will start to damage the image quality. The farther off your exposure or white balance are the more damage it will do to the image. Shooting RAW is like shooting with film in a way. You have an exposure that can be easily manipulated an optimized without damaging the image. It's a little like a digital negative. To shoot RAW takes a little more knowledge in knowing how to run the software and manipulate your image. DSLR's normally come packaged with software to manipulate RAW files, but most professionals don't use this software. The most common RAW conversion software is Adobe Lightroom, Adobe Camera Raw (built into Photoshop) and Capture One by Phase One. The software isn't cheap, but it will provide you with the best results. In RAW converting software there are multiple improvements you can make that the camera would normally try to make on jpeg's. The difference is that you can see the improvements being made while the camera is just guessing. You can adjust things like exposure, white balance, saturation, sharpness and much more. You can easily recover images that have been over or under exposed by about 2 stops without noticing it was ever a problem. You can also get the right white balance to get the perfect colors in your image. There are different schools of thought on RAW vs. JPEG, even among professional photographers. I shoot RAW, and I like the workflow. But there are plenty of professional photographers that swear by JPEG. It all comes down to personal preference. If you are happy with the JPGs you are creating then maybe you should stick with it. If you feel like you want more from your images then give RAW a shot. The important thing for now is to know what it does and that it's available to you. Conclusion You made the right decision in purchasing your DSLR. Just don't waste the potential in your camera by using it like you would any old point and shoot camera. Practice. That's how you are going to get better. You have a major advantage over someone trying to learn even 15 years ago. Every time they pushed the shutter button they were spending money. They were spending money on the film, and they were spending money on the processing. Now pressing the button costs you nothing. Plus you get instant feedback in the back of the camera on its LCD! If you don't like the picture you can make instant changes. You have a great opportunity to learn how to take great pictures. Go out there and make some good ones!
Digital Photography Beginners
© Copyright 2017, Digital Photography Beginners. All rights reserved.

RAW vs JPEG

Pictures

Having your DSLR set in a

mode to create jpeg's is the

easiest, but not always the

best.

You really need to make sure your exposure and white balance are close to perfect. Because if you need to make adjustments it will start to damage the image quality. The farther off your exposure or white balance are the more damage it will do to the image. Shooting RAW is like shooting with film in a way. You have an exposure that can be easily manipulated an optimized without damaging the image. It's a little like a digital negative. To shoot RAW takes a little more knowledge in knowing how to run the software and manipulate your image. DSLR's normally come packaged with software to manipulate RAW files, but most professionals don't use this software. The most common RAW conversion software is Adobe Lightroom, Adobe Camera Raw (built into Photoshop) and Capture One by Phase One. The software isn't cheap, but it will provide you with the best results. In RAW converting software there are multiple improvements you can make that the camera would normally try to make on jpeg's. The difference is that you can see the improvements being made while the camera is just guessing. You can adjust things like exposure, white balance, saturation, sharpness and much more. You can easily recover images that have been over or under exposed by about 2 stops without noticing it was ever a problem. You can also get the right white balance to get the perfect colors in your image. There are different schools of thought on RAW vs. JPEG, even among professional photographers. I shoot RAW, and I like the workflow. But there are plenty of professional photographers that swear by JPEG. It all comes down to personal preference. If you are happy with the JPGs you are creating then maybe you should stick with it. If you feel like you want more from your images then give RAW a shot. The important thing for now is to know what it does and that it's available to you. Conclusion You made the right decision in purchasing your DSLR. Just don't waste the potential in your camera by using it like you would any old point and shoot camera. Practice. That's how you are going to get better. You have a major advantage over someone trying to learn even 15 years ago. Every time they pushed the shutter button they were spending money. They were spending money on the film, and they were spending money on the processing. Now pressing the button costs you nothing. Plus you get instant feedback in the back of the camera on its LCD! If you don't like the picture you can make instant changes. You have a great opportunity to learn how to take great pictures. Go out there and make some good ones!
Digital Photography Beginners